All1950's1960's1970's1980's2000's

JoAnne Frenking Klosner, ’53

Mary Flotte Kroupa, ’55

Jackie Savage Naunheim, ’57

Margaret Amidei Galbraith, ‘59

Denise Stauder, ’66

Constance “Connie” Moeller Bachmann, ’68

Ann Geist Boyce, ’68

Mary “Mimi” Webster Murphy, ’68

Linda Shead, ’68

Suzanne Bromschwig, ’70

JoAnne “Midge” Gannon Crider, ’71

Kathleen “Kathy” Murphy McCurdy, ’71

Arlene Prather-O’Kane, ’74

William “Joe” Hatley, ’82

Betty Summers Hayward, ’82

Jo Jasper Dean, ‘84

Scott Brandt, ’85

Larry Hays, PhD

Justin Brown, ’02

Todd DeGrand, ’02

Torrey Welsch, ’02,

Justin Panther, ’06

Shelby Miller Gliebe, ’15

Elizabeth Kiblinger, ’15

Armon Provo, ’15

Nikki Taylor, ’17

Casey Ward, ’17

Courtney Haller, ’19

JoAnne Frenking Klosner, ’53

“One of my fondest memories is that of my vocal teacher, Stella de Mette Liazza. She was a world-renowned grand opera singer who debuted in Genoa at the age of 19. She sang in opera houses across Europe and the United States and was widely accepted as the leading American woman singer in several opera companies. After retiring, Mrs. Liazza taught voice for 11 years at Maryville College. She was such an influence in my life. I treasure the great memories I have of my two years at Maryville.”— JoAnne Frenking Klosner, ’53

Mary Flotte Kroupa, ’55

“My most treasured Maryville memory is from October 8, 1951. That day, the Maryville College seniors hosted a mixer for the upcoming Freshman class. (Maryville was an all-girls college at this time). As freshmen, my group of girlfriends were looking forward to attending the mixer and were awaiting the evening ahead of us and wondering what the night would bring.

As we entered the dance, a group of senior girls asked eight of us to line up. I was able to glance ahead and see a group of eight boys who were already lined up. There was something about the fourth one in line that caught my eye! I immediately shifted my place in line to be number four in line for the girls. We had a lovely time dancing and mingling with that group of young men.

When the mixer ended, one of the boys in the group offered to give all of us a ride home. We were wondering how all of us would fit, but we were surprised and delighted to find out the “ride” was a limo from his fathers’ business. We drove to all ends of town in it and laughed the entire way home. When the limo pulled up in front of my house, my mother and sister were peeking out the window. They were quite surprised to see my ride and in wonder of who was bringing me home! Needless, to say our first freshmen mixer was wonderful! Just “Good Ole Fun”!

The following weekend, Saint Louis University hosted a freshmen mixer. Guess who the first person I saw was when I entered the dance? Yes, it was number four! And number four and I eventually fell in love and married. We had 60 glorious years of marriage. I will always hold this memory dear to my heart and cherish it forever.”— Mary Flotte Kroupa, ’55

Jackie Savage Naunheim, ’57

There were many memorable moments. One of my favorite nuns was Mother Marion Rose Bascom, RSCJ, ’25, who ran the University Library. She taught me how to repair and glue damaged library books according to her specifications.

My favorite teacher during my first year was Ms. DeMenil. She taught me math, which was always my favorite subject. She was from a famous St. Louis family that dated back to 1834.
I remember well the Father-Daughter Banquet held in February of 1954. I learned later that fathers came from 18 different states to attend with their daughters. It was a wonderful evening.

A highlight for me that year was the musical we performed. I had the lead role of the Captain in the HMS Pinafore. It was truly a special evening. And of course the very best memory of all was getting to know so many new friends, many of whom I still see today. Also, learning to play bridge was another highlight. Even though I had planned to attend four years, I met my future husband, Gene, and we married in November of that year.

Margaret Amidei Galbraith, ‘59

“Freshman year our dorm rooms were on the fourth floor. We had a spacious room that held four beds, four dressers, four desks, four wash basins and four towel racks … nice … but we had to walk up all those stairs to get to our room. Using the ancient elevator was only allowed if you broke your leg! At the end of the corridor were doors that led to the Cloister where the “little sisters” lived. One Sunday afternoon we were “studying” in our room when we heard one of the sisters call out “Girls, Girls, get Mother Scott there are BOYS on the roof!! We ran to the windows. Forget Mother Scott!! We wanted to see those BOYS!”— Margaret Amidei Galbraith, ’59

Denise Stauder, ’66

“Congratulations to Maryville University for 150 years of continuing the legacy to provide a high-quality educational experience for generations, begun by the Religious of the Sacred Heart.

As a member of the Class of 1966, I have many wonderful memories of my four years as a student and the lifelong friendships that have continued to this day. I am especially grateful for the many values imparted and liberal arts education I received at Maryville. These have been instrumental and vital for me to successfully make several career and life transitions through the years.

May Maryville University, it’s faculty and staff celebrate their efforts and also leave a legacy, through their students today, that will also be celebrated 150 years from now!”— Denise Stauder, ’66

Constance “Connie” Moeller Bachmann, ’68

As an art major, I had the honor and privilege of being a student in Rodney Winfield’s painting classes. In one of our very first classes, Mr. Winfield came in wearing a witch’s pointed black hat. He offered no explanation. He looked a bit silly and had a whimsical grin on his face. It was NOT Halloween season. He sat down and began the class. We students looked at each other and began to giggle and smirk. He did not miss a beat. He offered, “Do you think I seem foolish? Maybe I do. However, remember this. If you want to be an artist you cannot be afraid of making a fool of yourself. It can happen.” WISDOM!

Ann Geist Boyce, ’68

“It has been my privilege to remain an active alumna of Maryville University. My college days prepared me for a teaching position in a top-rated school district and gave me my very close, lifelong friends. As an alumna and donor, I see that Maryville deeply values each student and makes every effort to ensure that even 50 years after their graduation, these students will believe, as I do, that Maryville made a tremendous impact and difference in their life.”— Ann Geist Boyce, ’68

Mary “Mimi” Webster Murphy, ’68

Anita Valle, Dwyla Tunstall, Mary Lorenz and I lived in the basement of Professor Lorenz for two months while construction of the new dorm was being completed. In those days, Maryville provided linen service, but we had to take the sheets and towels to the dorm. Imagine the shocked look on the milkman’s face when the four of us came trudging up from the basement with our stuffed pillowcases. We had a great time!

Linda Shead, ’68

“For me, Maryville has been a pathway to success and a lifeline to a career. I began my Maryville journey as a commuter student, known as a “day hop.” I rode to school every day with Myra, the switchboard operator, and Jim Thomas, the custodian. I enjoyed being in their presence, listening to their conversations and life experiences as I began mine at Maryville, learning who I was and who I would become. My four years went by so quickly, but it was all very enriching for me. My favorite professor was Edith Rich, PhD, who taught biology and genetics. She had such a passion for her students and for science, and she became a mentor to me.

Today, I have a legacy here at Maryville which I’m very happy about. My sister, Sylvia Shead, graduated in 1973 with her degree in biology. My granddaughter, Marissa Jones, will be a fourth-year student in the Rawlings Sport Business Management Program. And as of last summer, my niece, Veronica Shead, is an adjunct professor of psychology and teaches classes for Maryville’s online psychology programs. I can’t say enough about Maryville and how grateful I am to have had this school in my life.”— Linda Shead, ’68

Suzanne Bromschwig, ’70

Professor Emerita of Music Katja Georgieff, PhD, was a wonderful woman. She was — along with Sister Harriet Ann Padberg, RSCJ, ’43 — one of my fondest memories of Maryville. Though Dr. Georgieff formally joined the faculty of Maryville in 1975, she was teaching there when I was a student; I graduated in 1970. Dr. Georgieff devised a piano class for a few of us for whom private lessons would have been a luxury. Her influence at Maryville began many years before she was named a faculty member.

JoAnne “Midge” Gannon Crider, ’71

“When I was a student at Maryville, the Religious of the Sacred Heart spent so much time introducing us to the community and making sure we understood our responsibility to become involved in the community. Maryville still does that today. The mission is the same as it was: get involved in your city, get involved in your school and do what you can to make the world a better place. You learn while you’re doing this, and you become a better person while you’re doing this.”— JoAnne “Midge” Gannon Crider, ’71

Kathleen “Kathy” Murphy McCurdy, ’71

I remember the main lounge where the boys would announce the girl they wanted to come down.
I remember the girls playing bridge in the main lounge.
I remember the rooms at the end of the hall in Duchesne. They were “smokers”!!!
I remember taking out the school cars which they had for us.
I remember taking a free bus to the cardinals baseball games. The Busch Family gave us those tickets!
I remember Professor Emeritus of Art Kent Addison and the sculpture classes I took all day on Tuesday and Thursday.
It was so much fun! Great memories!

Arlene Prather-O’Kane, ’74

I have great memories of living on campus during the two years and a summer it took to complete my ADN degree. Besides living in the dorms, going to “the Ranch House” was always fun to get together with other students for barbecues and just to hang out! I remember the “Streaking Days” on campus, watching someone come through the cafeteria streaking! Fun times on campus!

William “Joe” Hatley, ’82

“Maryville means everything to me. It is a place where I felt accepted for who I was. I developed a lot of skills, met a lot of wonderful people and it really set me on a path to be able to be successful in life.

What I enjoyed the most about my time at Maryville was the bonfires in the woods. Those woods no longer exist, but it was a wonderful time back when it was a more rustic campus.

My favorite memory was the Great Blizzard of ’81. We had something like two feet of snow in the course of a night and everything closed down. People couldn’t get in; food couldn’t get in. We were reduced to eating cold sandwiches from the cafeteria. It was really fun, and it really bonded everyone on campus and brought us closer together.

It’s hard to pick just one favorite professor; there are three who come to mind. The late Marshall King, PhD, who inspired me to go to law school and gave me a lot of confidence to do that. The late Dennis Wachtel, PhD, who was a tremendous teacher and a great friend. And John Wickersham, PhD, who had such an impact on me it’s just hard to describe. He really opened my eyes to the greater world and taught me to be more of a thinker and not just go through life day by day, but instead think about the bigger things in life.”— William “Joe” Hatley, ’82

Betty Summers Hayward, ’82

“When I moved to St. Louis from Toledo, Ohio, in 1978, a friend who lived there gave me a tour of the area near where I moved. And that tour included a visit to Maryville University (at that time Maryville College).

I fell in love with not only the beautiful campus, but also the fact that it was only 10 minutes from my house. I had been working on completing my bachelor’s degree, and this seemed to be a perfect set-up for placing my two daughters on the bus bound for Bellerive Elementary School and then hurrying off to Maryville’s campus — “Ten minutes from kitchen to classroom,” I called it.

One of the first classes I took was taught by Mary Ellen Finch, Phd, then dean for the School of Education. I can’t recall the title of the course, but I do remember that it was held in McNally House. And I also remember that the students were allowed to sit on the floor and have a cup of coffee or other drink while doing so!

In Maryland in the late 1950s, we weren’t allowed to do anything except sit up straight, pay attention and follow directions!

Oh, my gosh, I said to myself! Learning now might even be fun! And it turned out that that course and others at Maryville were taught in a less stressful environment and felt like fun – most of the time.”— Betty Summers Hayward, ’82

Jo Jasper Dean, ‘84

“Besides the great education I received, I have fond memories of going to Weekend College for my business degree while traveling weekly for my job and gathering at Abeyta’s Mexican Restaurant after Friday night classes with my fellow classmates to commiserate how we were navigating the challenges of juggling a career, business travel, family, and school.”— Jo Jasper Dean, ’84

Scott Brandt, ’85

“I have very fond memories of Maryville. At the time, I was the only male student enrolled in the interior design program. Steve Teczar, past chair of the art department, was my advisor, and continues to be a great friend of mine to this day. The program afforded me the opportunity to further explore my inner artist, and I was encouraged to take art classes to develop my artistic skills while learning design skills.

I had great mentorship from the professors. People were really interested in who you were as a person. I had a studio back in a maintenance shed and I was allowed to stay there as long as I wanted. I could come in on weekends and stay through the night. I ended up making large-scale prints while completing my coursework.

I’ve let that creative spirit follow me to this day. I thank all of you at Maryville for making me who I am today.”— Scott Brandt, ’85

Larry Hays, PhD

“Maryville’s 150th anniversary brought back many memories from my 33 years at Maryville as vice president for administration and finance.

Sister Rocklage was one of my wife’s instructors when she was in the three-year diploma program at St John’s Mercy Hospital. Sister Rocklage was also in the delivery room assisting the doctor during the birth of our son.

I knew Sisters McNally, Switzer, Padberg and Biles and before we built the library the Board of Trustees met in the McNally house living room. One of our Board Finance Committee meetings was held in John Simon’s apartment at the Chase Hotel.

Kent Addison donated his sculpture tools to my wife when she decided to major in Fine Arts and become a stone sculptor.

I knew James McClellan and worked with every board chair who followed him until I retired in 2015.

I made many presentations at the Town & Country city council meetings as we built the library, art & design building, Anheuser Busch Academic Center, Donius Student Center, auditorium, five student apartment buildings, Buder student commons building, the acquisition and renovation of the properties for the President’s residence and Potter hall and the renovation to create the President’s Conference Center. I also participated in many meetings with Dr. Pritchard and Tee Baur as Maryville Center was developed.

Dr Pritchard and I met with Mrs. Faust (of Faust Park) who donated the statues at the foot of the spiral staircase in the library.

I attended the trial in county court when we successfully sued the state to get a fair price for the western edge of the campus when it was taken to construct highway 141.

I tend to get carried away when talking about Maryville University. It is very exciting to witness the quality of the growth and progress following my retirement.”— Larry Hays, PhD

Justin Brown, ’02

“My time at Maryville was incredible: the experiences, the friendships and the foundation from which I’ve grown personally and professionally will forever be a part of who I am. While I’m currently on the West coast and not able to visit campus as much as I would like to, I stay connected with other Maryville alumni and am constantly looking for ways to get involved. As an alumnus, donations are an easy and meaningful way for me to give back. This is not about writing a check, but more about preserving the memories and legacies I experienced, and enabling the university to preserve its mission and vision statements and afford scholarships opportunities to those exceptional individuals that may otherwise not be able to afford an education.”— Justin Brown, ’02

Todd DeGrand, ’02

The first time we played, I think it was my freshman year. We went to Iowa and we were at the course, but we couldn’t practice because it was raining. The next day, we were going to jump into playing and the guys and I decided we’d turn our hotel room into a driving range, and we practiced indoors. I think it was a testament to our dedication to do what we could to do better.

The spirit of Maryville and the welcoming feeling when you come on campus for me is something I really cherish and remember. As you start to play and get into the team aspect, you start to get that dedication and that preparation you do for that sport. I think that is what I take into my own business today and knowing that teamwork and preparation is going to lead to success, as well as that family atmosphere and fun environment. That’s what I try to bring in to every day —recreating what we did here at Maryville.

Watch Video

Torrey Welsch, ’02,

We had a lot of different personalities, but we call came together, focused and worked hard. And we all had a common goal each year: to push ourselves to be the best. We never doubted ourselves. We had a good time and were all different but we really enjoyed each other.

For our spring season, we went to Hilton Head every year for a week for a lot of practice and playing and that’s some of my best memories. We would play from sun up to sun down with each other and getting so spend all that time together was something special and something I don’t think I’ll ever forget.

Being at Maryville it’s 100% what you make of it. You can push yourself, you can push each other, you can push your teammates and you can be successful. I think that’s really what you see with student-athletes; they take what they learn here and take something that started small and turn it into something big. I think that’s the best thing about Maryville, it’s all about what you make of it.

Watch Video

Justin Panther, ’06

“One of my favorite Maryville memories is participating in the Habitat for Humanity spring break trip to help clean up after Hurricane Katrina. Those trips helped me learn how devasting natural catastrophes can be and the importance of strong and enforceable building codes. Those experiences, coupled with my degree in actuarial science, helped push me towards my career in predictive catastrophe modeling.”— Justin Panther, ’06

Shelby Miller Gliebe, ’15

It goes really quickly. I can’t believe we’ve been out of college as long as we have been. Just take advantage of every opportunity you get. Enjoy it, have fun!

Watch Video

Elizabeth Kiblinger, ’15

My favorite memories came from my team and my coaches: the bus rides, asking for dessert after races, taking jumping pictures after every meet, the fun practices Coach Conley put on for us, the glow run, chocolate milk miles — just all the fun times we had.

A lot of the skills from being a student-athlete transferred to teaching: time management, perseverance and patience — with the little ones when they’re being chatty. I’m so grateful of the skills that Maryville taught me.

Watch Video

Armon Provo, ’15

Being a student-athlete at Maryville teaches you a lot about time management, perseverance, responsibility and patience. Student-athletes have to have a team of people around us; we can’t do it ourselves, we have to rely on other people. I encourage all students to immerse themselves in the University because if I had to do it again, I wouldn’t choose any other school other than Maryville because of the community and the camaraderie that exists between everyone. It’s very touching to be able to come back. We can be apart for three or four years and I can come back and it’s like I’ve been walking the halls for weeks.

Watch Video

Nikki Taylor, ’17

Everybody backed everybody up and that’s what you have to do everywhere you go. At my job, I try to do the same thing with my employees. Coach Kelly and Coach Donnie, they supported us. And that’s what I try to be to all my employees at work. You have to keep pushing that to your life.

Watch Video

Casey Ward, ’17

Our team, we were very close, like a family. We learned to cooperate with each other, even when you might not be on the same page … you talk things through … being a team player. Honestly, we say that a lot at work: learning to get along with people and work with them … care about each other … that makes the day go better. Not only with work family, with friends, your personal family and just being able to take your own step forward.

Watch Video

Courtney Haller, ’19

My Maryville Moment has to be when I walked across the stage at Commencement. Going back to school as a graduate student while juggling my full-time job, my toddler, the birth of my son, and everything else life threw at me was no easy feat. I felt so much pride! P.S. – The Dan + Shay concert on campus before they became mega stars is definitely a close second!

What’s your My Maryville Moment?

Accepted file types: jpg, gif, pdf, png, Max. file size: 5 MB.
Accepted file types: mp4, mpg, mov, avi, Max. file size: 100 MB.
This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.